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Prosecuting Terrorism Cases in the Federal Courts

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Video: Federal Courts Work

As the Obama Administration takes steps to shut down the Guantanamo Bay facility, the heated debate over when and how to prosecute suspected terrorists continues. But there is really no need for debate. Federal criminal courts can handle terrorism cases and have for years. In fact, they are our best line of judicial defense against terrorism. In the meantime, the Supreme Court has ruled that Guantanamo prisoners can challenge their detention in federal courts. Certain commentators have argued that we need a "legislative fix" to provide procedural guidelines—and authorize indefinite detention. In fact, the courts are the ones who can and should decide when military detention is legal, and they have. Why create new, inherently flawed, systems to replace one that works? Our federal court system can handle these cases.

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