Subscribe to First Page and join our fight for human rightsSign Up
Home / Press

Press

Press Releases

February 10, 2011
Washington, DC – Amidst news that President Hosni Mubarak plans to step down from power, Human Rights First is calling the move a necessary step in Egypt’s transition from autocracy to a more...
February 03, 2011
Washington, DC – In response to news reports that scores of journalists and human rights activists are being hunted down and have been detained by the Egyptian authorities, Human Rights First’s Neil...
February 03, 2011
Washington, DC – Human Rights First is pressing telecommunications companies and Internet providers operating in Egypt to share details about the circumstances in which the past week’s service...
February 02, 2011
Washington, DC – As Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak addressed the Egyptian people yesterday, he told them that they had to choose between “chaos and stability.” – a false choice that Human Rights...
February 02, 2011
Washington, DC --i Tonight, President Obama called for a peaceful transition of power in Egypt, one that incorporates input from across the political spectrum and reflects support for the fundamental...
February 01, 2011
Washington, DC – As protests and cries for reform intensify in Egypt, Human Rights First International Policy Advisor Neil Hicks will offer commentary and discuss the organization’s policy...
February 01, 2011
Washington, DC – Today, Human Rights First in coalition with 50 other civil rights and human rights organizations urged Congressional leadership to object to divisive hearings that House Homeland...
February 01, 2011
Washington, DC –Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has announced that he will not be a candidate for the Presidency in elections scheduled for September or October, but that he will remain in office to...
February 01, 2011
Washington, DC – A year after Secretary of State Hillary Clinton declared the “freedom to connect” to be a Fifth Freedom, as important to human liberty as the Four Freedoms Franklin D. Roosevelt...
January 31, 2011
New York City – Human Rights First is calling on the Obama Administration to take steps to ensure ongoing protests in Egypt do not turn into a bloodbath. Specifically, the group is urging President...

Pages

Media Inquiries

Media Relations Team

202-547-5692

Email Media Relations Team

HUMAN RIGHTS FIRST IN THE NEWS

'We are this generation's Ellis Island': 45,000 Afghans housed at US Army bases still wait to be resettled

Sarah Al-Arshani , Business Insider US
Nov 21, 2021, 09:48 AM

The US airlifted 73,000 Afghans to the US since the Taliban took over in August, Reuters reported. 

Around 45,000 Afghans at US bases are still waiting to be resettled, The Washington Post reported. 

There are also another 26,000 applications from Afghans looking to enter the US awaiting review.

For more stories, go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za.

Around 45,000 Afghans housed in temporary camps at US military bases are still waiting to be resettled more than two months after they were withdrawn from Afghanistan, The Washington Post reported. 

"We are this generation's Ellis Island," Curtis Velasquez, an Air Force colonel and "governor" of the "village" at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico, told the Post. 

The village at Holloman is one of eight areas on US bases set up to house Afghans as they wait to be resettled in the country. Reuters reported that the White House's National Security Council said 73,000 Afghans have been airlifted to the US.

7,100 ended up at Holloman and more than 4,000 are still housed there, the Post reported. 

Additionally, Reuters reported there are about 26,000 applications from Afghans looking to enter the US under a special programme that are waiting to be reviewed by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services, a part of the Department of Homeland Security. 

USCIS spokesperson Victoria Palmer told Reuters the agency has been reviewing those applications as they come along and most are handled within 90 days but the increase in applications this year would most likely mean delays, but she did not say for how long. 

The Post reported that those on humanitarian parole here don't have an immediate path to permanent residency and lack access to some benefits offered to refugees such as medical and counseling services. 

The Biden Administration has asked Congress to pass the Afghan Adjustment Act, which would give those resettled in the US the ability to apply for a green card after a year. Human rights non-profit groups like Human Rights First have urged Congress to pass the bill. 

"This is an important step toward helping at-risk Afghans arriving in the United States with nothing, following the fall of the elected government of Afghanistan. It is heartening to see Congress recognise that Afghans starting to build lives here in the United States should be provided with the welcome and integration services and benefits they need," Human Rights First Senior Director of Government Affairs Jennifer Quigley said in a press release.

'We are this generation's Ellis Island': 45,000 Afghans housed at US Army bases still wait to be resettled

Sarah Al-Arshani , Business Insider US
Nov 21, 2021, 09:48 AM

The US airlifted 73,000 Afghans to the US since the Taliban took over in August, Reuters reported. 

Around 45,000 Afghans at US bases are still waiting to be resettled, The Washington Post reported. 

There are also another 26,000 applications from Afghans looking to enter the US awaiting review.

For more stories, go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za.

Around 45,000 Afghans housed in temporary camps at US military bases are still waiting to be resettled more than two months after they were withdrawn from Afghanistan, The Washington Post reported. 

"We are this generation's Ellis Island," Curtis Velasquez, an Air Force colonel and "governor" of the "village" at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico, told the Post. 

The village at Holloman is one of eight areas on US bases set up to house Afghans as they wait to be resettled in the country. Reuters reported that the White House's National Security Council said 73,000 Afghans have been airlifted to the US.

7,100 ended up at Holloman and more than 4,000 are still housed there, the Post reported. 

Additionally, Reuters reported there are about 26,000 applications from Afghans looking to enter the US under a special programme that are waiting to be reviewed by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services, a part of the Department of Homeland Security. 

USCIS spokesperson Victoria Palmer told Reuters the agency has been reviewing those applications as they come along and most are handled within 90 days but the increase in applications this year would most likely mean delays, but she did not say for how long. 

The Post reported that those on humanitarian parole here don't have an immediate path to permanent residency and lack access to some benefits offered to refugees such as medical and counseling services. 

The Biden Administration has asked Congress to pass the Afghan Adjustment Act, which would give those resettled in the US the ability to apply for a green card after a year. Human rights non-profit groups like Human Rights First have urged Congress to pass the bill. 

"This is an important step toward helping at-risk Afghans arriving in the United States with nothing, following the fall of the elected government of Afghanistan. It is heartening to see Congress recognise that Afghans starting to build lives here in the United States should be provided with the welcome and integration services and benefits they need," Human Rights First Senior Director of Government Affairs Jennifer Quigley said in a press release.